Update for 1/2/18

Hey look, I remembered to use 2018. Let’s see how long that lasts! New review today for Wow! Retracted by David Robertson and a gaggle of other artists…

Robertson, David – Wow! Retracted

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Wow! Retracted

To every comics artist out there who worries endlessly about putting out comics on a regular basis, you could do a lot more than emulating David. The bulk of his stories are short, usually only a few pages long. This lets him submit comics for all kinds of anthologies, and every year or so he has more than enough material to put out a book of his own. See how easy it is? Granted, lots of artists only deal with larger stories, but at least having the ability to work on shorter stories would be a nice change of pace for whenever you get stuck on whatever epic you’re working on. So hey, enough of the life advice, how about this comic? The bulk of these 40 (!) stories are written and drawn by David, with about a dozen of them coming from other artists. There’s no central underlying theme, just a big old pile of stories about all sorts of things. OK fine, his “I Live With a Killer” stories (about how his cat brings him pieces of various animals it’s killed) have a connecting theme, but they’re the exception here. Other highlights include the final thoughts of thelast two survivors from a plane crash, our first encounter with aliens, petty space station revenge, the man who’s always falling in love, the story and fate of Dolly the cloned sheep, a story of a missile attack (written by his son I think?), the concept of putting people in concerts who just want to talk for the whole show in their own section, exactly how much of your life you waste on vacuuming, skipping an internet video only to see it on the actual news later, a comic about making a comic that sort of eats itself (drawn by Zu Dominiak), the story a mouse brings back home after nearly being eaten, the robot and the monster, and the inner lives of a couple of flies. That’s what, not even half of the stories here? It’s another pretty fantastic bunch of stories from David, and if you’ve somehow gotten this far in life without seeing his work this is a solid chunk of comics to start with. No price listed, so I’m going to guess the arbitrary number of $10. Contact David and I’m sure he can set you straight…

Update for 12/27/17

It’s the last review of the year! I was thinking of writing another review or two, but why tempt fate when I’m going out on such a great book? New review today for Spinning by Tillie Walden, happy new year everybody!

Walden, Tillie – Spinning

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Spinning

If you’re anything like me, you scan the “best of” lists at the end of the year more to check to see if you missed something rather than looking for a reason to get outraged if your favorite didn’t make the list. Unless you’re an internet troll, I guess. Anyway, I hadn’t heard of this book before seeing it on a list (Onion AV Club maybe?), and wow am I glad that I didn’t miss it. This is Tillie’s graphic memoir (and at least her third book) and, as of this writing, she’s 21. Maybe you’re thinking that 21 is too young to put out a memoir, that a person that young wouldn’t have the perspective or insight to have much to say. Yeah, I might have guessed that too, and you and me both were very, very wrong. This is the story of Tillie’s life as she navigated being in constant training for competitive ice skating, starting at a very young age. She had to get up ridiculously early, was forced to socialize with people that she otherwise didn’t like (mostly), had her skating literally judged constantly, and otherwise tried to navigate growing up with all of that hanging over her. Oh, and she knew from a very young age that she was gay, but wasn’t sure when/how to tell anybody. She also had parents with wildly differing enthusiasm levels for what she was doing, along with all the problems that come with that. I feel like the laziest reviewer in the world when I constantly say that I don’t want to ruin a book by talking about, that it should be experienced by the reader with as few preconceived notions as possible. And hey, here I go again, doing that exact same thing! But this time I’m reviewing a book that is legitimately one of the best things I’ve read all year, and it’s not just me saying it! She’s a graduate of the Center for Cartoon Studies and it shows; she has some serious skills, especially when you consider the fact that most of her life was devoted to an entirely different field. In here she shows no fear, letting quiet moments become awkward when necessary, speeding through some of the parts that needed it, and just generally knowing when to go for an emotional gut punch and when to back away. I’m still stunned that she’s so young! It’s clear that the next generation of cartoonists is going to have a lot more training in the field before putting their books out. I guess purists/cranks might say that books lose a bit of their charm when they’re so expertly done (getting away from the punk aesthetic), but screw that. Mini comics by people who are making it up as they go are one of my favorite things in the world, but another favorite thing is seeing somebody put it all together and producing a masterpiece. Tillie managed that here, and everybody reading this who’s wondering what to splurge on with that holiday money should look no further than this book. $22.99

Update for 12/21/17

New review today for The Elements of Rough by Max Clotfelter, wrapping up an unintentional (short) week of reviews of people who haven’t been around this website for a while. Will there be reviews next week during the holiday taint season? Who knows? Probably not, but maybe!

Clotfelter, Max – The Elements of Rough #1

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The Elements of Rough #1

Finally, it’s the secret origin story of Max! OK, sure, he’s done autobiographical comics before. But Max had a simple conceit for this one: to answer all of the people who are constantly asking him why his comics have to be “so rough.” Since I’ve literally had friends come by, see his comics and ask me variations of the same question, he’s clearly not exaggerating how often he gets asked this question. The answer is a little more simple than you might have guessed: because he’s been surrounded by a colorful cast of characters his entire life. His father was quick to make friends with weirdos and slow to kick people out who were just looking to drink for a few days, leading Max to a childhood with his parents bailing friends out of jail, regular drinking and driving by all concerned, and running into an inmate that Max knew as he was cleaning a local library in his prison uniform. The nexus for all sorts of craziness ended up being a seedy liquor store that Max’s father owned, leading to even more colorful characters. Eh, “colorful” might imply “wacky” or “harmless,” and a few of these characters seem perfectly capable of doing harm. It’s an interesting story and it explains a few things, but Max promises that things get even weirder in the next issue, so there’s that to look forward to. If you’re a fan of his work it’s pretty much mandatory to get this comic, and if you’ve never read his stuff this is as good an introduction and anything. So basically you should buy this one either way, with the only exception being if you’re a terrible person who hates comics and only reads these reviews to torture yourself about all the unregulated art going on in the world. Hey, if it can be imagined, somebody on the internet is doing it…

Update for 12/19/17

Short reviewing week because of holiday stuff, but the new review today is for The Fifty Flip Experiment #21 by Dan Hill.

Hill, Dan – The Fifty Flip Experiment #21

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The Fifty Flip Experiment

Now that is one old timey website. Granted, given my lack of skills is designing (or even maintaining) a website, I shouldn’t be making comments, but there’s some real Geocities-like flashing graphics on that link above. Click it and see! Anyway, it’s been a few years since I’ve seen a comic from Dan, and each time I review an issue I come away from it feeling like I’ve failed to convey just how unique and bizarre it was. Maybe I’m referring to the man, but I’m definitely referring to the experience of reading the comics, complete with the introduction this time around. He mentions in his intro that he put the it in the front of the comic because it was more important to him that the words be on the first page “so that the book looks like a comic book… I take it on faith that things that look like comic books will, given enough time, more or less actually become comic books.” Welcome to the world according to Dan Hill! If you’re alarmed by that #21 on the cover and feel like you’ll never catch up on the story, don’t fret, this issue stands all by itself. Dan explains the real story in his intro, but on a surface level this is the story of a time traveler in a spacesuit who wreaks havoc and death on what appears to be a peaceful alien race who play Jenga as a mating ritual. His sidekick only communicates by little lines of paper that come out of her head and, as there’s rarely time to read them in the heat of battle, he usually reads them while putting together the mission in his head, trying to figure out where the comments belong and what they refer to. Naturally there’s also a final battle with a big boss and something ends up getting thrown into the sun. Once again I feel like I failed to give an accurate summation of this comic, but maybe it’s just impossible. Reading a Dan Hill comic is a singular experience, and everybody should try it at least once. If you’re cheap he has a lot of samples up on his website, possibly even full comics. $5

Update for 12/15/17

New review today for 22 Tapes by Toby Jones, happy weekend everybody!

Jones, Toby – 22 Tapes

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22 Tapes

If you’re a Cartoon Network nerd and you’re thinking that the name “Toby Jones” sure seems familiar, congratulations, you are correct! He’s worked on Regular Show for a few years and has dabbled in several other projects. He also put out a comic recently, obviously. I can’t find anywhere online to buy it, but if you’re curious there are a lot of ways to contact the guy and he must have an answer. The concept of the comic was simple enough: he had recently converted several old tapes from his childhood years and was going to watch one each night, making a comic out of his reactions and thoughts on those tapes. He was only able to make it through seven tapes so far (spoiler alert, I guess), but it was a rich variety of material. He cringes at any of his attempts to mimic Tom Green, goes over what was happening on certain days of taping and guesses at possible moods, watches several early attempts at animation (or claymation) and is occasionally mildly impressed with the craftsmanship, but rarely impressed with the content. Impressed with the craftsmanship while also grading on a curve, obviously; good animation for an early high school kid isn’t exactly good animation for Cartoon Network. He even finds a few things that are genuinely funny, much to his own surprise. If you’re the type of person who saves all of this sort of thing from their childhood and are wondering if it’s worth the time to dig through it, this comic provides a possible answer. I’d say they’re at least worth a cursory glance, even though I say that as a guy who has several notebooks worth or writings from high school and college that I haven’t seen in decades, so maybe I’m not the best guy to ask. Still, if you can find a copy of this, it’s fascinating at times and a real peek into both the early creative process and how that process can be seen by the adult version of that person.

Update for 12/13/17

New review today for Apartment Number Three by Pascal Girard, which should help give you a whole new perspective on that one creepy neighbor. You know the one I’m talking about…

Girard, Pascal – Apartment Number Three

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Apartment Number Three

Are you looking for a comic that will take a little bit of awkwardness and keep right on going with it until you’re no longer sure of the hero/villain of the piece! Then do I have a comic for you! Eh, maybe it’s not fair to declare either of these people as a villain or a hero, that’s for you to decide. Things start off with a young woman coming home with some groceries. She notices her downstairs neighbor staring at her out the window as she gets home and calls a friend about it, and it’s obviously something that happens on a regular basis. The guy never leaves the house and creeps her out in general, so she decides to do a bit of research to find out about him. She discovers that he’s a cartoonist who hasn’t published anything for several years, but quickly runs into a wall in her research when the landlady refuses to offer any information. She then manages to get her hands on his apartment keys, leaving only the slight problem of being unable to break into his place because he never leaves. This is when the awkwardness and the tension really gets going. Things end on a real _____ note (I don’t want to give away the ending by saying what kind of note), with some real ambiguity about who is or isn’t doing the right thing. It’s certainly engrossing, with all kinds of open-ended questions about boundaries (real and imagined) between neighbors. $5

Update for 12/11/17

New review today for The Heap by Caitlin Cass, which should help make you think twice about any gigantic piles of assorted trash that you may see in your neighborhood.

Cass, Caitlin – The Heap

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The Heap

So here’s a question: is this a fantastic allegory for this specific moment in time, or a fantastic allegory for the modern era in general? Opinions differ, I imagine. The cover does a great job of explaining the concept, so I’d recommend clicking on it to see, but basically a group of people decide to lie in an apathetic pile of the ground, doing nothing at all. They have different reasons for doing so, but various levels of apathy and giving up on the world are the main culprits. This is odd but not of great concern to the county at large, this being America and all. The heap gets almost subconsciously organized, but still not towards any goal or reason for being. Finally an outside group decides to step in and help, and this is when things really start taking a turn. That’s all you get out of me, but Caitlin’s stuff is always worth a look; this comic doesn’t do a thing to disprove that notion. Now if you’ll excuse me, I’ve been inspired to start an immobile mass of humanity to see what comes of it… $4

Update for 12/7/17

New review today for Wag Rag #2, the second of the monthly mini comics that Poopsheet started up a few months back. It also came with a review zine for several other minis, and it’s been ages since I saw a printed review zine. Give them your money so that they keep doing this subscription service!

Poopsheet Foundation – Wag Rag #2

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Wag Rag #2

Poopsheet, a gentle piece of advice for your monthly mini comic service: put a clearly visible link to it on your main page somewhere! I eventually had to back out of your site and try again through Google to get the link, and that’s only because I knew it existed, which most people don’t yet because it’s a new (and great) idea. Unless there is a link that I just missed because I’m a dummy, but if that’s the case other dummies might want to read comics too, so make it idiot proof! That’s enough time on my teeny tiny soapbox today, how’s the monthly comic this time around? It’s a collection of strips from various artists, with stories dealing with Caesar Meadows showing various ways to start a strip, Roger Langridge showing four types of panels that always work, Billy McKay discovering what lives inside of his electric razor, and Hal Mundane getting into an argument with himself and losing. This was the monthly comic for October (it’s the start of December as I write this, meaning I’m a bit behind), but there is a new comic out for October, so here’s hoping that this is all still going well for Poopsheet. If you do appreciate the idea of a monthly mini comic service, I’m thinking that subscribing yourself would be a damned fine way to show that support… $5 (monthly)

Update for 12/5/17

New review today for Ask a Cat Digest #4 by Charles Brubaker, and no, I also don’t know when it started being called a digest!

Brubaker, Charles – Ask A Cat Digest #4

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Ask a Cat Digest #4

Aspiring cartoonists, you could learn some lessons about productivity from Charles. The man puts out a ridiculous amount of mini comics (I should point out that I don’t review every single book he sends me because if I did this website would be all about his comics; yes, he really is that productive). And hey, it’s another collection of his cat strips. Questions this time around deal with why the cat doesn’t use a laptop to answer questions, the concept of a cat cafe, what cats do when there’s a blackout, what they think of snakes, how they deal with it when their owner gets sick, what they do all night when people are sleeping, and their opinion on coupons. It’s another solid collection of strips, and by now you know the drill, right? If you like cats and/or hypothetical cats answering questions, it’s worth a look! $2

Update for 12/1/17

New review today for His Last Comic by Noah Van Sciver, which is also sadly the last of the current batch of mini kus books. Happy weekend everybody!

Van Sciver, Noah – His Last Comic

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His Last Comic

For those of you who are literal by nature, don’t fret! This isn’t actually Noah’s last comic. Or maybe it is and he just never told anybody; guess we’ll have to wait and see on that one, huh? This is also a mini kus book, in case that wasn’t obvious from the tiny blurb on the cover. Things start off with a fictional comic book artist who’s vowing that the current comic he’s making is the last one he’ll do, as nobody appreciates his work and he feels like he’s already wasted 20 years on this endeavor. Don’t be fooled, as this is not a Noah stand-in. This guy thinks the early days of Image comics, with things like Wildcats, Spawn and Youngblood were the cream of their crop, was the pinnacle as far as comics go. He’s spent his career trying to emulate those artists and is constantly baffled when regular people in his orbit don’t recognize his greatness. But along comes a witch in a magic potion shop to give him a potion labeled “desire.” He’s supposed to use this on himself to have the best month of his life, but in a fit of annoyance he pitches the potion into the ink machine at the printer for his comic. So this does lead to him finally being recognized, but once he sees why he’s being recognized he has to take a trip back to the witch to get everything sorted out. I’ll say no more, as there’s plenty more goodness to be had here, but any fans of Noah’s work already know that the man can basically do no wrong. Buy his books, if you’re not already doing so! This is mostly just a public service announcement to let you know that he’s put out a new book under a different publisher here, so don’t let it slip by you… $6